Synthetic Nickel Based Hydrogen Catalyst Based on Hydrogenase Enzyme Speeds Up Hydrogen Evolution Reaction in Electrolytic Cell

Various kinds of bacteria can evolve hydrogen from water using the enzyme hydrogenase. The evolution of hydrogen is a key step in bacterial fixation of nitrogen from the atmosphere. Chemists at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed a synthetic nickel based catalyst for electrolytic hydrogen evolution based on the known structure of hydrogenase. Physorg has published a story about this research and an abstract of a recent publication of the experimental results is available on line. Nickel based catalysts are already used in commercial alkaline water electrolyzers such those produced NEL Hydrogen (formerly a part of Norsk Hydro). The hope of using hydrogenase base catalysts is to speed up the reaction and thus to reduced the amount of electrode material required to produce a given amount of hydrogen. The PNNL group has succeeded in making a fast hydrogen evolution catalyst but the efficiency with which it turns electrical energy into chemical potential energy is low compared to more conventional catalysts. The PNNL group is now focusing on means for making their catalysts more efficient.