Rhenium photo catalyst developed that reduces CO2 to CO using sunlight

Fossil hydrocarbons (e.g oil, natural gas, coal, etc) are used as feed stock for synthesizing a wide variety of useful compounds. Since humanity is tearing through the available feed stocks at far higher than the natural replacement rates an alternative feed stock will some day be required. One possibility is to use CO2 captured from the atmosphere. However, in order to convert CO2 into useful products it must first be reduced to carbon monoxide (CO) which is an energy intensive process. Some amount of research effort has been directed at using sunlight to drive photo catalytic reduction of CO2 to CO. Rhenium based catalysts can accomplish this feat using ultraviolet photons. However, ultraviolet light is a small component of incident sunlight so that a practical solar driven process requires a catalyst than can use the lower frequency visible components of sunlight. Chemistry World recently published an article about an Chinese/French collaboration that has succeeded in altering rhenium based catalysts so that they can catalyze the reduction of CO2 when radiated with visible light with a quantum efficiency similar to the utra-violet driven version of the same complex. Whether or not this particular organometallic complex is good enough (e.g. cheap enough, long-lived enough, efficient enough) to from the basis of a practical industrial process is not yet clear.